Skip to content

Increased Educator Pay through the Workforce Compensation Initiative to Reshape Early Educator Landscape

Young child at classroom table with teacher

Increasing early educator compensation to create a stable, well-paid, and highly-qualified workforce was a top priority that came out of Baby Prop C. At the time Baby Prop C was approved by voters, San Francisco was experiencing educator turnover rates at an average of 75% every two years. In many other places across the nation, the pandemic only further exacerbated the existing early childhood education workforce crisis. But DEC’s Workforce Compensation Initiative, funded by Baby Prop C, has created a different story in San Francisco. 

The Workforce Compensation Initiative includes two types of funding to increase educator wages

One

Early Educator Salary Support Grants (EESSG) to agencies that allow them to adjust educator salaries and benefits 

Two

Compensation and Retention Educator Stipends (CARES 3.0) that increase educator pay via stipends paid by DEC directly to eligible educators. 

The funding type educators receive is based on the program type they are working in and the percentage of subsidy-eligible children being served.

At Early Educator Salary Support Grant (EESSG) sites, where at least half the children come from low- to moderate-income families, educators now earn 30-47% more. No teacher earns less than a living wage of $28 per hour, and the average wage ranges from $29.50 to $37.00 per hour. Educators who received CARES 3.0 stipends saw their compensation rise by an average of $12,336 annually.

Impact of EESSG on ECE Teacher Wages

No Data Found

No Data Found

Average CARES 3.0 Stipend Awards (Annualized)

No Data Found

No Data Found

The Workforce Compensation Initiative has increased wages, and that has increased educator satisfaction. We are proud to support a stable workforce in San Francisco, because we want children and the educators that care for them to thrive. Paying educators more means they can now afford to stay in the field they love, and San Francisco has made major progress in recruiting new highly skilled educators. A stable, well-compensated, and highly qualified early care and education workforce benefits everyone in San Francisco by enabling both educators and parents to work and stimulate the economy.

Compensation initiatives have stabilized the workforce and improved conditions for educators.

In a recent survey, educators reported:

0 %
EESSG
0 %
CARES 3.0

They are more financially stable

0 %
EESSG
0 %
CARES 3.0

There has been a positive change in the work environment and culture

0 %
EESSG
0 %
CARES 3.0

Work-life balance has improved

%
EESSG
0 %
CARES 3.0

They are likely to find a job outside of the ECE field in the next 2 years

0 %
EESSG
0 %
CARES 3.0

They are likely to remain at current employer in the next 2 years

Learn more about the landmark compensation increases for early childhood educators and care providers.